Three Reasons we need a Department of Cyber security

Fast forward to the current day and the FCC, responsible for commercial networks seems to be the only one holding out on an overarching policy.  Without a Nationwide department exclusively for Cyber Security, there remains a huge crater size hole between the cyber policies of various departments and institutes which constitutes a serious vulnerability.  

What we can identify from the Atlanta Cyber-attack.

The computer network of the City of Atlanta was hit by a ransomware attack which paralyzed a substantial percentage of the city’s data. The hackers demanded $50,000 to unlock the system. 

The Atlanta attack forced many city departments and organizations to go offline for several days, meaning that residents were unable to pay bills or fines and police were unable to electronically file paperwork – breathe deep, tickets were issued by hand. 

The real cost of a cyber breach at your company…..Do CEOs really know?

Consider the top five most significant expenses that a business has to manage after a breach.

Remediation

In 2017 the Ponemon Institute reported it takes more than six months for an organization to find out they have had an intrusion and another 55 days to contain it. Remediation does not necessarily mean the attack has been completely stopped, either, as some attacks remain dormant and undetected.

Loss of customers

I told you Crypto wasn’t safe

This week the news of more Cryptojacking were published, the more I saw people shaming others or gloating about how unsafe, unreliable crypto currencies are. I felt a strong desire to write about this in the blog and I will talk more about it in my podcast next week. (See CyberHub Engage).

But for this blog post I want to talk about Crypto Jacking and why it’s happening as often in a product that’s supposed to be “safe”.

What’s Cryptojacking?