Bitcoin Nazis

Many have tried to clampdown on Bitcoin regulation, including steps taken by the Chinese to end Bitcoin mining, South Koreas' total Bitcoin ban and Egypt's call for branding Bitcoin as "haram'.

Yes, powerful leaders are shaking in their boots and yet, decentralized digital trading has continued to grow exponentially.

When should an organization report a data breach?

No matter what its size or cybersecurity posture, your organization is vulnerable to cyber crime and data breaches. Under federal, state, and international laws, once organizations become aware of a breach they have a certain amount of time to report it to the relevant supervisory authority. Sitting on an incident without reporting it puts organizations at risk of legal and other ramifications.

Trouble on the horizon: what ENISA’s Report tells us about the threat of data breaches

Last month, the European Union Agency for Network and Information Security (ENISA) published its 2017 ‘Threat Landscape Report’1. The Report comments on general trends in the area of cybercrime, and identifies and gathers data on 15 top “cyber-threats”. Many of the threats identified in the Report are designed to target vulnerable individuals. However, one particularly topical cyber threat draws concern both from individuals and organisations: the increasing threat of large scale data breaches.

Knowledge Is Power in the Battle to Control Our Data

The sheer amount of data we generate on a daily basis can be more than 300 MB each day and sharing some of this information is a part of modern life. Attempting to control who collects, uses and shares our personal information requires technical tools and know-how and a basic understanding of what risks can ultimately emerge. But before anyone offers up a standard set of tips for how best to manage your privacy, it’s worth taking a moment to learn more about the complex data ecosystem in which we all now live – and what that means for controlling information about us.