• Alert for 2018: The Top Four Developing Cyber Threats
  • Alert for 2018: The Top Four Developing Cyber Threats
  • Alert for 2018: The Top Four Developing Cyber Threats
  • Alert for 2018: The Top Four Developing Cyber Threats

Alert for 2018: The Top Four Developing Cyber Threats

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Alert for 2018: The Top Four Developing Cyber Threats

Wed, 03/28/2018 - 17:49
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Cybercrime is unlikely to take a backseat this year. In fact, it's highly likely that Cyber security will come as an intrinsic element of any automation equipment purchased.

Cybercrime is unlikely to take a backseat this year. In fact, it's highly likely that Cyber security will come as an intrinsic element of any automation equipment purchased.

As the innovation in the technology market continues to advance at a pace that we could have barely fathomed fifteen years ago, so do weaknesses.

The SANS institute has put forward an estimate that more than 80% of cyber security incidents are utilizing already known vulnerabilities. Gartner Inc. puts that approximation far higher, estimating that within the next two years, 99% of cyber-attacks will be largely familiar to the Cyber Security industry. 

This has meant that Cybersecurity certification and encrypted software are fast becoming standard issue, as we adapt to high speed cybercrime that is almost inevitable in every commercial sphere.

It may seem like we are totally overwhelmed by the number of upcoming cyber threats, but sorry to burst the bubble, you ain't seen nothing yet.

Being alert for the bigger cyber threats with higher impacts, is an important element of being able to prep for eventualities in any business.  We have summarized our top four developing cyber threats below:

1. Crypto-jacking

Although cryptocurrency is feeling a little bit wobbly this year, after such a strong celebrity style increase in 2017, it still is a highly disruptive and hugely important market.

As cryptocurrencies escalate in 2018, Crypto-jacking will be enormously attractive to cyber criminals, to the point that some are calling it the crypto-jacking 'goldrush.' It doesn’t require significant hacking skill and hackers can make money with little risk.

Crypto-jacking is when a hacker uses your computer to mine for cryptocurrency.  Hackers get the victim to click on a malicious link in an email which loads crypto mining code onto the computer.  This code is then hidden but active users continue to use their computers and performance slows or is less able to perform tasks.

2.Blackmail through Ransomware

“Ransomware is likely to become a developing cyber threat which will have the ability to encrypt data and blackmail data banks and owners. For geo-political and international aims, these threats will grow and become a top priority for Governments worldwide.

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This is largely due to their huge publicity and shock value, think of the high profile cyber extortions such as Sony 2014 and Ashley Madison 2015.  Being a high impact hacktivist is highly alluring and very lucrative.

3. Increased PowerShell-based attacks

PowerShell is a very powerful tool that is hugely helpful for executing commands and querying systems and the hackers love it too. The industry has seen many malware authors creating new way to avoid detection when they attack (OS) tools. These are file-less attacks, there is no software being used – this makes it easy to avoid the antivirus software and attracting to the criminal element. 

Powershell can move passed the screening capabilities of many standard security products. Powershell attacks, in the main, come in the malware form of VAWTRAK, Poweliks and CRIGENT.

Cyber-attacks using PowerShell malware are so enticing because they do not raise red flags. attackers are succeeding in using PowerShell to enter and remain undetected in a company’s system.

4.Clash of the bots

Bots are big a– from chatbots for online delivery to self-driving cars, the human error can be dramatically reduced by employing our robotic friends. However, the threat of bots being manipulated to the 'dark side' is a reality we must deal with.  Disruption and avoidance is the name of the game and hackers are interested in of course, security driven bots but also in penetrating important bots for blackmail.

With the incentive of serious cash and fame, cybercrime is only going to grow. Our collective responsibility will be to make fighting that crime as attractive as being involved. 

By James Azar on 3/28/18

Article first reported at CyberHub Summit