The Truth  Behind Social  Engineering 2/3

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The Truth  Behind Social  Engineering 2/3

Tue, 03/20/2018 - 00:49
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Worst of all is social engineering operated against children and adolescents who are not aware of the dangers of privacy violation on the Internet. Today, children and adolescents serve as a central pipeline to draw out information during a cyber-attack!

If you missed part one The Truth Behind Social Engineering 1/3 you are going to want to read it before reading this one. I started writing about social engineering and below is part II.

Worst of all is social engineering operated against children and adolescents who are not aware of the dangers of privacy violation on the Internet. Today, children and adolescents serve as a central pipeline to draw out information during a cyber-attack!

So, what can be done? What is next? How do you change an intelligent human being into a more cautious creature?

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A few small and important tips from me to you, I will only mention five out of at least 500 that I can share with you in the future:

  1. Open your eyes and open your ears!

Not everything that glitters is gold!  When I say to open your eyes I hope you open both eyes for details, God is in the small details, before you run to open an interesting file sent to you, or a tear jerking story that relates to you in email and after it there is a request to click on a link to continue reading, stop for a moment.  

Ask yourself carefully who is sending this? do they sound familiar to you?  if not so then from what site is it coming? What are its sources? Is the email address a normal one? Does this person have a business or social page in the social networks? Go to Google, search and who knows what you will find there.

You will be surprised what you can find about people through Google, YouTube, and current social networks. 

Have you received an email from this source in the past? Are any of your acquaintances aware of this source?

SMS and Texts: If it comes in the form of a text message, no matter what, do not click on any link, also if the source sounds reliable, still ask yourself two basic questions and continue from there:

  1. Do I identify the source?
  2.  If I do not identify the source is it pressing for me to click on the link now or can it wait until I check on this?

is relevant to me? And if it isn’t relevant, delete immediately, whatever you do, do not click on any links from sources you don’t know.

  1. Never provide a credit card by telephone or online!

Have you taken the time to review said Internet site and undertaken a comprehensive examination of beforehand, and even if you went there on your own and saw a product that interests you it could be that there is a marketing story based on social manipulation of hackers and you are not aware of this at all, rather you are excited of something that sounds too good to be true!

Therefore, do not rush to give a credit card to sites that are not protected by a SSL system.

SSL is a popular and very important protection protocol on the Internet, all legitimate Internet sites are protected by way of cryptographies and are supported by Google Chrome, Safari, Firefox and so on and so forth…

This system is “supposed to” prevent eavesdropping, counterfeiting or malicious changing of information conveyed between the network and the customer. It is a network that allows for anonymous connection between the customer and the server when conveying details thus protecting your details and ensuring no one can snag them. Look for the lock on the top of the browser next to the website address. If you don’t see it, don’t do it!

In the next post I will share some more great tips of how you can handle these threats!

For questions please email info@cyberhubsummit.com

Karin Zalcberg

 

By Karin Zalcberg on 3/19/18

Article first reported at CyberHub Summit

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